Wellness Culture

WWB WATCH: The Center for Science in the Public Interest Has an Important Health Update For You…and How Sweet it is Not!

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If you missed the NYT article this Sunday on how the sugar industry manipulated research findings to downplay sugars role in heart disease, you can find the links here. Before you do, below is a quick but important message from the Center of Science in the Public Interest worthwhile reading. Their wise advice is echoed by the best experts and doctors from around the world.

I think the biggest challenge we face is the conflicting cultural dichotomy we live in. Wellness experts have been trying to warn us for the last twenty years about the dangers of a diet filled with sugar and fat, and yet our ‘pop culture’ which is everything from marketing promotion and traditional supermarkets, are peddling processed food to us ‘as if’ none of this wisdom and research was out there. I will acknowledge, some supermarkets are getting better with attuning to our health needs, but we still have a long way to go. For now, the best takeaway from WWB is ‘just because they are selling it, doesn’t mean we should buy it.’ If you leave your health and family’s health in the hands of marketers, you will not be able to send them the medical bills. Choose wisely and remember…

 

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FROM THE CENTER FOR SCIENCE IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST

 

New research from the University of California San Francisco finds that in the 1960s, Big Sugar paid scientists to downplay sugar’s role in heart disease: http://ow.ly/H5Pc3048OTB These findings provide one more reason why scientific journals should disclose all potential conflicts of interest in study abstracts.

But just because Big Sugar blamed saturated fat for heart disease doesn’t mean saturated fat is blameless. Both saturated fat and sugar promote heart disease. Major health authorities like the American Heart Association recommend that a healthy diet should limit added sugars (especially from sugary drinks) and replace foods rich in saturated fats (like meat, butter, and cheese) with foods rich in polyunsaturated fats (like fish, oils, and nuts). Read more: http://ow.ly/DRay3048IUC

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